CAN YOU PAY CHILD SUPPORT IN CASH?

As someone who pays child support each month, you know when your support payment is due and how much it is. One thing you're not clear on, though, is what methods you can use to pay.

While you usually pay through a payroll deduction, you're changing jobs and haven't set up the new deduction yet. You'd like to pay child support in cash this month, but is that really a good idea?

HOW DO COURTS CALCULATE MY INCOME WHEN DETERMINING CHILD SUPPORT?

Every mother or father who expects to pay child support wants to know the all-important question, "How much child support am I going to have to pay?"

It's understandable that they want to know. The information will help them predict their future expenditures while establishing their post-divorce budgets.

CHILD SUPPORT: JUDGES LOOK OUT FOR A CHILD'S BEST INTERESTS

Child support is an important aspect of compensation for children with separated or divorced parents. Children who live in single-parent households need the support of both parents, whether those parents are wealthy or not.

Child support is not designed to make the noncustodial parent suffer, but it does mandate that individual to help support their child financially. In cases where parents see children for an equal amount of time, support may be reduced or eliminated completely depending on the case.

CONCERNED ABOUT CHILD SUPPORT? KEEP THIS IN MIND

Many people believe the misconception that child support is supposed to go to the child alone. The reality is that child support doesn't only need to pay for the child's clothing or specific school items.

Child support is there to help give a child a better home, to provide money for extracurricular activities, to provide medical care and even to make sure that they have food and clothing. Some people argue that they do not want to pay the money to the other parent because they are worried about how it will be spent. On the whole, the most important thing is that the child is well-cared for.